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O'Reilly Tags

We're experimenting with a folksonomy based on tag data provided by del.icio.us. Follow development in this blog post.


Rethinking Community Documentation (20 tags)
Good documentation makes good software great. Poor documentation makes great software less useful. What is good documentation, though, and how can communities produce it effectively? Andy Oram explores how free and open source software projects can share their knowledge with users and how publishers and editors fit into the future of documentation.

Design by Wiki (14 tags)
Is your project drowning in a sea of useless, out-of-date, and irrelevant documentation? Or is your project foundering with no map whatsoever? Before you shell out time and money for a proprietary package, consider that a humble wiki may solve most of your woes. Jason Briggs explains how his team uses MoinMoin to track its project documentation--and diagrams.

Using NDoc: Adding World-Class Documentation to Your .NET Components (13 tags)
Shawn Van Ness had never been a big fan of source-code-based documentation generators - tools that attempt to produce reference documentation by mining specially-formatted comments from source code. The concept is clearly of great value: by scanning the source code, the doc-generator can alert the author to any code items that are missing documentation. But the rumors are true - he recently met a new documentation generator, and he's fallen in love. Its name is NDoc, and he does believe it loves him too.

MySQL Federated Tables: The Missing Manual (6 tags)
A new MySQL storage engine allows you to use tables in remote servers as if they were local. Unfortunately, the documentation doesn't explain much more than that. Fortunately, Giuseppe Maxia can explain everything you need to know to make federated tables work correctly and efficiently.

Best Windows Admin Downloads (4 tags)
There are more than 9,000 tools, templates, white papers, and other items available from the Microsoft Download Center. Which are the best for Windows administrators? Mitch Tulloch clues you in.