Women in Technology

Hear us Roar



Article:
  What Is OpenDocument
Subject:   state of california
Date:   2006-08-23 09:58:00
From:   phubert
I found the brief paragraph about the state of california -interesting-, but must ask just what the SOURCE of such information is. I've been in state IT for 36 years, currently at the Lottery, and see ONLY Microsoft implementations and PROPRIETARY orientation. I HEARD of ONE Linux/OSS implementation -ONCE-, but I've heard nothing since and have NO contacts for such things.


If anyone HAS any information on who and where, I'd LOVE to hear about it. I've been an _advocate_ for years, but it's been like a voice crying in the wilderness.

Full Threads Oldest First

Showing messages 1 through 1 of 1.

  • Sam Hiser photo state of california
    2006-08-23 10:18:30  Sam Hiser | O'Reilly Author [View]

    I'll point to two examples that are public information:

    - The Contra Costa Water District uses Red Hat/Oracle among all the other systems:
    http://www.stoneflynetworks.com/applications/success_detail.asp?id=112

    - Bill Welty at the Air Resources Board also has long experience with open source & Linux:
    http://www.linuxjournal.com/article/7827

    Quoting from Tom Adelstein's article...

    Bill also openly discusses having his agency be in control of the software. He states that open source provides his agency with control over upgrades and source code. He also believes that the agency's software allows users to access data without requiring them to stay current with proprietary solutions.

    In the same breath, Bill begins discussing Metcalfe's law, the law developed by Robert Metcalfe of PARC, who also is known as the Father of the Ethernet. Metcalfe stated that the value of a system equals the square of its nodes. The ARB team sees that value because its Internet sites are organized and supported organically. The knowledge of the organization increases exponentially as everyone participates in sharing their knowledge.


    In addition to full knowledge of the current open standards issues and awareness of OpenDocument Format, there is a great deal of Linux/Apache know-how in California working under the radar.