Women in Technology

Hear us Roar



Article:
  What Is Wireless Security
Subject:   Errors and omissions
Date:   2006-03-31 21:35:19
From:   imipak
First, there is no such thing as 802.11x - the correct name is 802.1x - and the protocol is a full security protocol, not a port restriction mechanism.


Secondly, there is no mention of IPSec - a major player in security that covers both wired and wireless networks.


Lastly, the article seems to assume that you have only mobile stations connected to a single wireless access point that is itself connected to a wired network. None of these are necessarily true.


Indeed, this is why there are over 150 routing protocols defined for wireless networks, and why the IETF have two working groups - one for mobile computers that may move between wireless access points, and one for where an upstream router may itself be a wireless device.


The article, as it stands, would make an excellent first chapter (if the 802.1x error is fixed) for a much longer piece that covers the different types of mobile scenario and what needs to be done in each.


However, as a finished piece, I can only give it a 5/10.

Full Threads Oldest First

Showing messages 1 through 2 of 2.

  • Matthew Gast photo Errors and omissions
    2006-04-11 21:03:57  Matthew Gast | O'Reilly AuthorO'Reilly Blogger [View]

    As security advice, SSID hiding is woefully misguided. All but the most rudimentary analysis tools automatically recover the SSID from network management traffic. Hiding the (unencrypted!) SSID serves only to break client devices and generate calls to the help desk.

    Using WEP for anything other than casual security is advice that is years out of date. Networks built today should use WPA or WPA2 pre-shared keys at a minimum. Some devices, including a few small office devices sold at Best Buy, can also use the authenticated key management systems from 802.11i.

    Contrary to what the article states, WEP keys can be distributed and refreshed through 802.1X. The first serious 802.1X interoperability demonstration happened in the Interop Labs in May of 2002, nearly four years ago.
  • Errors and omissions
    2006-04-01 23:14:34  newuser007 [View]

    I guess that master's degree hasn't done him much good.