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Article:
  Best Practices for Exception Handling
Subject:   Don't wrap exceptions!
Date:   2003-12-01 08:14:43
From:   anonymous2
Response to: Don't wrap exceptions!

Sorry, but you're missing the point. Whether the business code knows about SQL or not is simply of no concern. Whether it is a SQLException or your "PersistenceException": the business code should not handle any exceptions it knows nothing about. And wrapping it only removed a single layer: if the business code itself is layered also do you wrap all exceptions of the lower layers???


Wrapping SQLException in something else does not solve anything: you still have to pass the exception around, and have some layer handle it.


What I'm saying is that IF you have a SQL error that you do not fix in the originating layer you may as well pass it upwards and have topmost layer decide what to do with it: report some critical failure and log the ACTUAL problem instead of logging the wrapper.

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  • Don't wrap exceptions!
    2003-12-03 13:58:50  anonymous2 [View]

    I've read this thread and I disagree with your point of view. What you're basically saying is that any low-level exception that can't be dealt with correctly by the layer above it, should be thrown all the way to the top layer.

    Then consider a typical J2EE application that has a simple web layer, a business layer and a database layer. If some SQL query in the database layer goes completely wrong I will get an SQLException of some sort. In your point of view the web application (being the topmost layer) will catch this exception in the end.

    This defeats the entire purpose of having a multitier (3+) architecture. I'm now dependent on the database layer in the web layer, because all exceptions are thrown all the way upwards.

    The point of the PersistenceException is that it keeps the tiers independent from each other, except for the tier beneath it. The web layer doesn't care if it's an SQLException. It only needs to know something went wrong with the business logic, and more specifically with the persistence of business data objects.

    In any case, the 'business code' knows more of what to do than the layers above it. If it can't do anything meaningful with it, you can either log it or perform some other action. The question is: what would a layer above it (eg. the web layer) know more of what to do than the business layer?