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  Two Servlet Filters Every Web Application Should Have
Subject:   ONJava.com: Two Servlet Filters Every Web Application Should Have [Nov. 19, 2003]
Date:   2003-11-22 21:20:24
From:   anonymous2
Response to: ONJava.com: Two Servlet Filters Every Web Application Should Have [Nov. 19, 2003]

FYI. I'm a Java programmer for a bank in Omaha, NE. We recently had a bunch of strange bugs pop up during testing. Our app is about 4 years old, and we'd never seen this behavior before. (Basically, we could tell that CSS and Javascript libraries were failing to load on the browser end). A little research turned up a known bug in IE - apparently Microsoft's browser sometimes chokes on compressed CSS files and JS libs. We checked our web server (IIS), and sure enough, someone had turned http compression on. Needless to say, we turned it back off, and we won't be able to use compression until the IE bugs are fixed. (Although the bug appears in IE 5.0, 5.5, and 6.0 at least, so I don't have much hope it will be fixed soon.)


Your filter may not cause the same problem, but it's something people should be aware of.

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  • ONJava.com: Two Servlet Filters Every Web Application Should Have [Nov. 19, 2003]
    2003-12-01 01:23:51  anonymous2 [View]

    IIS is not very bright when it comes to compression. Bascially they don't seperate it from the Caching part, making all things suddenly have weird cache control headers in their compressed state, when they had none before.

    Although... I have used Apache with gzip compression of everything (except jpgs) for 4 years, and have yet to have a problem with IE/x.x.

  • ONJava.com: Two Servlet Filters Every Web Application Should Have [Nov. 19, 2003]
    2003-11-24 14:52:26  anonymous2 [View]

    If you look at the examples you will notice that compression is only enabled on *.jsp and *.html files...