Article:
  Top Ten Tomcat Configuration Tips
Subject:   Top Ten Tips?
Date:   2003-06-28 04:51:04
From:   anonymous2
The title should rather read "The Most Often Asked 10 Basic Things About Tomcat You Can Resolve Yourself By RTFM"..


Really, these aren't *tips* but basic configuration settings - and these are described best in the manual, the config files themselves or being discussed a 1000 times on the mailing-list

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Showing messages 1 through 4 of 4.

  • Top Ten Tips?
    2003-07-15 15:13:30  anonymous2 [View]

    If only the author understood that one is supposed to think about the defaults, then he could tip us.

    This line:
    <Server port="8005" shutdown="SHUTDOWN" debug="0">

    means a DOS attack by a local user is possible

    telnet localhost 8005
    SHUTDOWN

    and you're down again, please tell your reader to pick a shutdown password that's not default

  • Top Ten Tips?
    2003-07-13 13:47:40  anonymous2 [View]

    For me, distilled tips like this are great. I suppose one could work through all the Tomcat "Manager" pages and then the "Realm" pages and then the "JNDI" pages and then ... you get the point. Tips like these that provide usable examples in the context of real-world discussion are perfect.
    Thanks.
  • Top Ten Tips?
    2003-06-30 06:05:48  anonymous2 [View]

    I think you are missing the point of this article,
    and probably, the book.

    For $40 US, you don't have to sift through
    the discussion groups, or read through config
    files. You don't even have to RTFM. Of course,
    if you are the type that likes to spend hours
    on end reverse-engineering xml config files,
    well by all means, stay away from books like
    this.

    Seems like a bargain to me, I'll be buying one.
    • Top Ten Tips?
      2003-07-08 15:25:47  anonymous2 [View]

      Yes, I have to agree. Though I'm on the Tomcat Users list and read it pretty regularly I still read and enjoyed the Wrox Tomcat book when it came out. I currently have this book out on Safari but have been too busy to look at it. But I will or I'll buy it instead. Maybe I'll do both.

      There's a tremendous convenience in having books at hand and there's nothing that makes you a better coder/techie/whatever because you don't waste your time with books. Seems like some sort of backwards tech machismo to me. And I see it all too frequently.

      I'm also happy to see someone make a little money from documenting this stuff. There are plenty of books that are a waste of everyone's money but O'Reilly books rarely (but sometimes) fit into that category.